Baicells: Public IPs on client routers

Public IPs on Baicells Client Routers.

I needed to Provide a few customers with Public IPs while most of the UEs and clients got private IP. The following is what I did to allow this to work:

Requirements:
EnodeB in Bridge mode
UE in NAT mode
MikroTik Router with DHCP handing out Private IP space to Baicells UEs.

Steps:

On MikroTik
Add new Public IP subnet to the same Bridge or interface as current DHCP server.
Edit current DHCP IP Pool and add a second list of IPs that are your Publics. Not a second pool. In DHCP Server window in the Networks tab add a new Network for the New Subnet
That is the MikroTik setup.

Connect the UE to the tower and find the device in the MikroTik DHCP Leases.
Make the UE leased IP Static. Then edit it.
Change the Lease address to one of the unused Public IP address in your pool. Apply.

In the UE: (only tried so far in Gen2)

Network > Lan settings > DHCP settings
Change Start IP and End IP address to the same (192.168.150.100) Save and Apply

Network > DMZ

Turn On DMZ
Set DMZ host to IP (192.168.150.100) Save and Apply

System > Web Settings

Make sure Redirect HTTPS is off. Save and Apply

Reboot UE.

When the UE is rebooted have customer reboot router.
From WAN side:
HTTPS://StaticIP Should bring up UE login
HTTP://StaticIP should go to the Customer Router Login or Port redirection.

Baicells Nova 436 News and Trade-In

This was released today. Thanks to ispsupplies.com for forwarding this over.

Announcement and updates on Nova 436

Below is an announcement recently posted by Baicells regarding reboot issues with the Nova 436 units:

As you are aware, our Nova 436 units have been experiencing reboot issues in the US market, with approximately 30% of the units affected. Our engineering teams have spent a significant time investigating, debugging, and analyzing both the hardware and software in the unit. We truly appreciate our customers patience and help throughout this process. Today, I am happy to provide an update to all of you.

We have identified the root cause of these issues to be related to the manufacturing and assembly process of the units, which impacted the quality and reliability of the unit, especially the three batches that were shipped to our US market. With these lessons learned, we will continue to take extra precautions to ensure we spend more time working with our manufacturing partners on quality assurance details for any future products.

As part of our review of these issues, we have decided to make the decision to discontinue sales of the current Nova 436.This will allow us to reallocate resources required for optimizing the supply chain process resulting in production of a more reliable product. As part of this process, we have been actively developing a new 436 version eNB, and are targeting a release date to be the next 90-120 days. Further news and details of the new eNB model will be shared when appropriate.

TRADE-IN PROGRAM
For any current Nova 436 eNBs which are exhibiting intermittent reboots, we are offering a 2-for-1 trade-in option. In exchange for each Nova 436, we will ship two Nova 233 Gen2 eNBs. For those who are not experiencing any reboot issues, you will have the opportunity to trade in for the next generation eNB once released.

To initiate the trade in, please send an email to sales_na@baicells.com with the subject “Nova 436 Trade-In Request” and provide your company name, address, phone number, and eNB serial number. A Baicells sales representative will reach out to handle the logistics of the exchange.

How to activate Baicells sim cards using the active code

How to activate Baicells sim cards using the activation code

Typically your sim cards will come in a 10 pack. On the back of the box you will see a listing of numbers with an Activation code at the top.

1.Login to the cloud core at https://cloudcore.cloudapp.net/cloudcore

2.Click on the “BOSS” link at the top then Expand network at the left and click on “Sim Card”

  1. Click on Import at the top. Once there select “Active code” and enter the number next to “AC” on the back of your box. This is the top number highlighted above

Once activated they will show up under your records.  More detailed information is available at https://na.baicells.com/getting-started/

Baicells announces local EPC

Dubbed BaiEPC, the solution will be available in two forms – Standard and Professional. The Standard version is designed for small to mid-sized networks, while the Professional version is designed for larger networks and provides smaller companies an expansion path as their businesses grow.

Baicells Announces Localized EPC at WISPAPALOOZA

Hangers to help with PIM

Are you running Telrad or Baicells? Need a solution to get every bit you can out of the system? Don’t forget your hangers can influence pim .

Traditional hangers and diameter-specific grommet combinations complicate installations, making it difficult to secure cables from wind and vibration, which can cause passive intermodulation (PIM) problems. 

Check out PIM hangers from Tessco.

Some Random Visio diagram

Below, We have some visio diagrams we have done for customers.

This first design is a customer mesh into a couple of different data centers. We are referring to this as a switch-centric design. This has been talked about in the forums and switch-centric seems like as good as any.

This next design is a netonix switch and a Baicells deployment.

Design for a customer

WISP LTE, PIM testing, and quality

One of the topics that came up during the Baicells troubleshooting tips was the notion of PIM testing, and cables which are PIM rated.

PIM sweeps are a common thing in the Cellular field.   One of the first questions folks often ask is what is a PIM sweep? If you think of PIM testing as a passive test and line sweeping as an active test that is a good start.  PIM testing looks for problems with things like connectors, cables, and other “layer 1” items.  A PIM test is not a line sweep. Line sweeping measures the signal losses and reflections of the transmission system. this is typically VSWR.  A line sweep is an active test. It can not detect the same things a PIM test can.  Many HAM radio folks are familiar with a line sweep where the reflected power is measure in an antenna system. In a line sweep you deal with reflected power and all that.

What does a PIM test do?

When you do a PIM test typical two high power signals are injected into the antenna line.  You can actually pass a sweep test but not a PIM test.

I won’t go into PIM tests very much because you need high dollar units such as those from Anritsu and Kaelus. These cost 10’s of thousands of dollars new.  Sometimes you can find these used.  However, the next thing you will run into is understanding the output of such a device.  Cell crews go to week long certification classes to become a PIM certified tech from Anritsu and others.

What causes a PIM test to fail?

According to Kaelus the most common problems are:

• Contaminated surfaces or contacts due to dirt, dust, moisture or oxidation.
• Loose mechanical junctions due to inadequate torque, poor alignment or poorly prepared contact surfaces.
• Loose mechanical junctions caused transportation shock or vibration .
• Metal flakes or shavings inside RF connections.
• Poorly prepared RF connections
•Trapped dielectric materials (adhesives, foam, etc.)
•Cracks or distortions at the end of the outer conductor of coaxial cables caused by over tightening the back nut during installation.
• Solid inner conductors distorted in the preparation process causing these to be out of round or tapered over the mating length.
• Hollow inner conductors excessively enlarged or made oval during the preparation process.

Why does cable matter?

Cables do not typically cause PIM, but poorly terminated or damaged cables can and do cause problems.

Cables with Seams can cause issues.  The seam can corrode.  Plated copper, found in cheaper cables, can break away from the aluminum core. This actually allows small amounts of flaking to happen between the connector and the core of the cable.  This will cause PIM issues and is very hard to diagnose. Imagine little flakes inside a connector. You don’t see them until you break open the connector, and even then they may be pretty little flakes.

Cables can change their physical configuration as temperature varies. For instance, sunshine can warm cables, changing their electrical length. A cable that happens to be the right length to cancel out PIM when cool may show strong PIM after changing its length on a warm day, or, it can work the other way around, good when hot and bad when cold. In addition, the physical change in length can make a formerly good connection into a poor one, also generating PIM. Other environmental factors such as water in the connector or cable can be an issue, as with any RF setup.

I think I have PIM issues. What are some indications?

PIM often shows up as poor statistics from the affected antenna. One of the first and most direct indications of PIM can be seen in cells with two receive paths. If the noise floor is not equal between the two paths, the cause is likely PIM generated inside the noisy receive path.

How Do I prevent PIM issues?

Cable quality and connector quality are one of the biggest factors in the PIM quality of a LTE system.  Many WISPs are used to making their own LMR cables and putting on their own connectors.  There is a difference between a low PIM LMR-400 cable and normal LMR-400.  Same for connectors.  One of the recommendations today was to use 1/2” superflex heliax.

The easy recommendation is to buy pre-made cables that have already been PIM certified.  In a typical WISP setup, you do not have lots and lot of components in your setup. Buy already certified components from your distributors that are “Low PIM rated”.