MTIN announces ISP security scan service

Are you an ISP wanting to know security scans of your network? MTIN now has some options to keep your network secure. Contact us for scans on your network to look for open ports and other vulnerabilities on your network that could be exploited.

MTIN also offers server checkup services.

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MTIN Family of Sites
https://indycolo.net
https://j2sw.com
https://startawisp.info

IPV6 Firewall rules for Mikrotik

Some basic IPV6 Firewall Rules for Mikrotik. Replace in-interface=”” with your appropriate interface.

/ipv6 firewall filter
add chain=input protocol=icmpv6
add chain=input connection-state=established,related
add chain=input dst-port=546 in-interface=ether1-wan protocol=udp src-port=547
add action=drop chain=input connection-state=invalid
add action=drop chain=input connection-state=new in-interface=ether1-wan
add chain=forward protocol=icmpv6
add chain=forward connection-state=established,related
add chain=forward connection-state=new in-interface=!ether1-wan
add action=drop chain=forward connection-state=invalid
add action=drop chain=forward connection-state=new in-interface=ether1-wan

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MTIN Family of Sites
https://indycolo.net
https://j2sw.com
https://startawisp.info

Mikrotik and two unique subnets across an Ipsec Tunnel

Recently we had an issue with an IPsec tunnel on Mikrotik passing multiple subnets across a tunnel with multiple policies. The problem is Packet forwarding and encryption only works for one destination (the first matched IPSec Policy) and the other subnet, which has the second policy did not work.  In our case, we had two subnets 192.168.115.0/24 and 192.168.116.0/24 going across the tunnel.  We could reach things on 116, but not 115.  The following blog post was the fix for our issue.

Mikrotik IPSec VPNs with multiple destination Networks/Policies and SA(s) management.

Once the level was set to “unique” everything was good.

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MTIN Family of Sites
https://indycolo.net
https://j2sw.com
https://startawisp.info

Use tarpit vs drop for scripts blocking attackers

There are many scripts out there, especially on Mikrotik, which list drop as the action for denying bad guy traffic.  While this isn’t wrong, you could put the tarpit action to better use for actions which are dropping attacking type of traffic.

So what is Tarpit?
Tarpit is fairly simple. When connections come in and are “tarpitted” they don’t go back out. The connection is accepted, but when data transfer begins to happen, the TCP window size is set to zero.  This means no data can be transferred during the session.  The session is held open, and requests from the sender (aka attacker) to close the session are ignored. They must wait for the connection to timeout.

So what’s the downside?
TCP is not really designed to hold onto a connection.  It can be additional overhead on a taxed system.  Most modern firewalls can handle tarpitting without an issue. However, if you get thousands of connections it can overwhelm a system or a particular protocol.

How can I use it?
If you have scripts, such as the SSH drop off the Mikrotik wiki, simply change the action to “tarpit” instead of “drop”.

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MTIN Family of Sites
https://indycolo.net
https://j2sw.com
https://startawisp.info