MTIN is growing again

Over the years MTIN has gone from being a computer repair shop to a dial-up ISP, to a Wireless ISP, and many things in-between.  Each time technology and market conditions change we adapt to change with it.  Our next metamorphosis is needed so we can grow into more aspects of the xISP world In order to accomplish this we are splitting into divisions of what we do.

The first is j2sw.com. This part of the business will be focused on personalised WISP services and support.  These will be custom tailored to a limited number of clients.  Projects such as the “Start a WISP” book and upcoming WISP publications will be run under j2sw.com. Other projects that benefit the ISP community will run from j2sw.com. Having j2sw Consulting as a separate arm allows for better personal attention to key customers.

The second division of the business is MTIN.NET.  This arm will be focused on business to business services such as data center co-location, network connectivity, tower services, and related type services. MTIN is becoming a project management company. We will leverage our vast partnerships to leverage the strength of many to accomplish your medium to large projects.   MTIN will be an umbrella company to bring in the right people for the right projects.

Look for changes to the websites and contact information coming over the next month or so. Justin will be involved with each entity on a very regular basis, but having extra folks can allow for time to be dedicated to ever-expanding projects without sacrificing service to the client.

Some FAQs
Why the change?
For a couple of reasons. The first is to leverage Justin being known in the xISP community.  having a face to the consulting side. This allows for better personal service as well as a trusted name in the WISP community. Secondly, is to allow a better division of resources based on projects and individual needs.

Is MTIN going away?
No, MTIN will move into a project management type of company.  We have access to a large network of contractors, partners, service providers, and other groups we have built since 1998. MTIN can bring in needed resources for projects under one contact point. This allows for projects to not depend on just one person.

Will contact info change?
In the upcoming months, we will be publishing updated contact info. The old information will not go away, but things will get routed to the proper folks better.

For now check out http://j2sw.com and like jswconsulting on facebook.

MTIN announces the support crate plan

Are you a WISP who needs just a little help now and then? Need a sanity check on configuration changes? Need someone who knows your network enough to say whether you need that most recent software upgrade?  Don’t have a big budget for the occasional issue? Need peace of mind you can call someone who won’t break the bank on a simple question? MTIN has a solution for you.

We are calling this the “Supply Drop Plan”. it’s designed for the WISP who needs someone who knows their network and their business for occasional questions outside of their comfort zone.  It consists of the following:
-2 Hours of consulting time a month.
-Reasonable amount of e-mail questions
-Be put on our e-mail notification list of relevant information
$89 a month.

Details
-Access to MTIN via phone during business hours or pre-arranged time (24 hour notice).
-e-mail questions tracked via a ticket system with a maximum of 24 hour response.  Most of the time same day.
-1 year contract

Just some things you can do with your two hours
-Have our engineers look at any new configurations you want to implement
-Unbiased advice on what equipment to order
-Help source equipment for wireless deployments on towers
-Make recommendations on upgrades
-Do audits on things like upstream providers, etc.

What’s not included
-Emergency support (we have plans for that). Emergency support is available but at non-contract rates on a first come first serve basis.
-Additional hours can be purchased on an as-needed basis.  Please note without an hourly block you will be first come first serve.
-Phone calls after hours must be pre-arranged. We can accommodate your schedule. Otherwise, support will be billed at after hours rates.

DMCA Designated Agent Directory updates

The following text is directly from: https://www.copyright.gov/dmca-directory/ 

A relevant F.A.Q. can be found at https://www.copyright.gov/dmca-directory/faq.html

Service Provider Designation of Agent to Receive Notifications of Claimed Infringement

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”) provides safe harbors from copyright infringement liability for online service providers. In order to qualify for safe harbor protection, certain kinds of service providers—for example, those that allow users to post or store material on their systems, and search engines, directories, and other information location tools— must designate an agent to receive notifications of claimed copyright infringement. To designate an agent, a service provider must do two things: (1) make certain contact information for the agent available to the public on its website; and (2) provide the same information to the Copyright Office, which maintains a centralized online directory of designated agent contact information for public use. The service provider must also ensure that this information is up to date.

In December 2016, the Office introduced an online registration system and electronically generated directory to replace the Office’s old paper-based system and directory. Accordingly, the Office no longer accepts paper designations. To designate an agent, a service provider must register with and use the Office’s online system.

Transition period: Any service provider that has designated an agent with the Office prior to December 1, 2016, in order to maintain an active designation with the Office, must submit a new designation electronically using the online registration system by December 31, 2017. Any designation not made through the online registration system will expire and become invalid after December 31, 2017. Until then, the Copyright Office will maintain two directories of designated agents: the directory consisting of paper designations made pursuant to the Office’s prior interim regulations which were in effect between November 3, 1998 and November 30, 2016 (the “old directory”), and the directory consisting of designations made electronically through the online registration system (the “new directory”). During the transition period, a compliant designation in either the old directory or the new directory will satisfy the service provider’s obligation under section 512(c)(2) to designate an agent with the Copyright Office. During the transition period, to search for a service provider’s most up-to-date designation, begin by using the new directory. The old directory should only be consulted if a service provider has not yet designated an agent in the new directory.

Vendors and core business

I had a client learn a lesson they should not have had to this evening.  The client has had several key servers hosted at a small data center for several years now. These were managed servers the data center took care of. Things like new hard drives were the responsibility of the data center so the client rarely paid attention to these machines.  As many of you know a server can spin for years and it is just forgotten about.

Tonight these servers come under a very heavy Denial of Service (DDoS) attack.  Fifteen plus Gigs come to bear at client’s servers for an extended time.  The client is unable to reach the data center NOC, nor do any of his contacts work.   The servers are knocked offline.  4 hours later the client finally receives an e-mail from the data center saying they unplugged the client’s router because it was taking down their (the DC’s) own network.  After asking to have a call from a manager client finds out the DC has restructured and dropped many of their co-location and other hosting services.  Their multiple 10 gig pipes have been reduced to one, and many clients have left.  The manager says they have re-focused their business to focus on things such as OLED screens, and other things totally unrelated to running a data center. The hosting they do have left “pays the bills” so they can have a place to do research.

The client has redundancy so they are not dead in the water.  However, this redundancy was only supposed to be for a short term duration due to costs.  The lesson learned is to keep in contact with your vital members.  Call up your sales person once or twice a year and see how things are going.  Keep in contact with key folks at the company.  If they are on LinkedIn add the company.  If their focus appears to change or they go silent do some leg work to find out what’s going on.

The Importance of cable support in LTE deployments

As the number of WISP LTE deployments increase, there are many things WISPs will need to be mindful of.  One such item is properly supporting antenna cables. LTE systems are more sensitive to cable issues.  In a previous blog post, I talked about pim and low-pim cables.   One of the things that can cause low pim is improperly mated cables.  If cables are not supported they can become loose over time.  Vibration from equipment or even the wind can loosen connections.

How do we support cables?
We can take a cue from the cellular industry. The following are some examples of proper cable support.  Thanks to Joshua Powell for these pics.

Where can you get these?
A good place to start are sites like sitepro1 or Tessco has a selection.

So the next time you are planning your LTE deployment think about cable support.

Learning, certifications and the xISP

One of the most asked questions which comes up in the xISP world is “How do I learn this stuff?”.   Depending on who you ask this could be a lengthy answer or a simple one sentence answer.  Before we answer the question, let’s dive into why the answer is complicated.

In many enterprise environments, there is usually pretty standard deployment of networking hardware.  Typically this is from a certain vendor.  There are many factors involved. in why this is.  The first is total Cost of Ownership (TCO).  It almost always costs less to support one product than to support multiples.  Things like staff training are usually a big factor.  If you are running Cisco it’s cheaper to train and keep updated on just Cisco rather than Cisco and another vendor.

Another factor involved is economies of scale.  Buying all your gear from a certain vendor allows you to leverage buying power. Quantity discounts in other words.  You can commit to buying product over time or all at once.

So, to answer this question in simple terms.  If your network runs Mikrotik, go to a Mikrotik training course.  If you run Ubiquiti go to a Ubiquiti training class.

Now that the simple question has been answered, let’s move on to the complicated, and typically the real world answer and scenario.  Many of our xISP clients have gear from several vendors deployed.  They may have several different kinds of Wireless systems, a switch solution, a router solution, and different pieces in-between.  So where does a person start?

We recommend the following path. You can tweak this a little based on your learning style, skill level, and the gear you want to learn.

1.Start with the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification in Routing and Switching (R&S).  There are a ton of ways to study for this certification.   There are Bootcamps (not a huge fan of these for learning), iPhone and Android Apps (again these are more focused on getting the cert), online, books, and even youtube videos. Through the process of studying for this certification, you will learn many things which will carry over to any vendor.  Things like subnetting, differences between broadcast and collision domains, and even some IPV6 in the newest tracks.  During the course of studying you will learn, and then reinforce that through practice tests and such.  Don’t necessarily focus on the goal of passing the test, focus on the content of the material.  I used to work with a guy who went into every test with the goal of passing at 100%.  This meant he had to know the material. CompTIA is a side path to the Cisco CCNA.  For reasons explained later, COMPTIA Network+ doesn’t necessarily work into my plan, especially when it comes to #3. I would recommend COMPTIA if you have never taken a certification test before.

2.Once you have the CCNA under your belt, take a course in a vendor you will be working the most with.  At the end of this article, I am going to add links to some of the popular vendor certifications and then 3rd party folks who teach classes. One of the advantages of a 3rd party teacher is they are able to apply this to your real world needs. If you are running Mikrotik, take a class in that. Let the certification be a by-product of that class.

3.Once you have completed #1 and #2 under your belt go back to Cisco for their Cisco Certifed Design Associate (CCDA). This is a very crucial step those on a learning path overlook.  Think of your networking knowledge as your end goal is to be able to build a house.  Steps one and two have given you general knowledge, you can now use tools, do some basic configuration.  But you can’t build a house without knowing what is involved in designing foundations,  what materials you need to use, how to compact the soil, etc.  Network design is no different. These are not things you can read in a manual on how to use the tool.  They also are not tool specific.   Some of the things in the Cisco CCDA will be specific to Cisco, but overall it is a general learning track.  Just follow my philosophy in relationship to #1. Focus on the material.

Once you have all of this under your belt look into pulling in pieces of other knowledge. Understanding what is going on is a key to your success.  If you understand what goes on with an IP packet, learning tools like Wireshark will be easier.  As you progress let things grow organically from this point.  Adding equipment in from a Vendor? Update your knowledge or press the new vendor for training options.  Branch out into some other areas ,such as security, to add to your overall understanding.

Never stop learning! Visit our online store for links to recommend books and products.

WISP Based Traning Folks.
These companies and individuals provide WISP based training. Some of it is vendor focused. Some are not.  My advice is to ask questions. See if they are a fit for what your goals are.
-Connectivity Engineer
Butch Evans
Dennis Burgess
Rickey Frey
Steve Discher
Baltic Networks

Vendor Certification Pages
Ubiquiti
Mikrotik
Cisco
Juniper
CWNA
CompTIA

If you provide training let me know and I will add you to this list.

How I learned to love BGP communities, and so can you

BGP communities can be a powerful, but almost mystical thing.  If you aren’t familiar with communities start here at Wikipedia.  For the purpose of part one of this article we will talk about communities and how they can be utilized for traffic coming into your network. Part two of this article will talk about applying what you have classified to your peers.

So let’s jump into it.  Let’s start with XYZ ISP. They have the following BGP peers:

-Peer one is Typhoon Electric.  XYZ ISP buys an internet connection from Typhoon.
-Peer two is Basement3. XYZ ISP also buy an internet connection from Basement3
-Peer three is Mauler Automotive. XYZ ISP sells internet to Mauler Automotive.
-Peer four is HopOffACloud web hosting.  XYZ ISP and HopOffACloud are in the data center and have determined they exchange enough traffic amongst their ASN’s to justify a dedicated connection between them.
-Peer five is the local Internet exchange (IX) in the data center.

So now that we know who our peers are, we need to assign some communities and classify who goes in what community.  The Thing to keep in mind here, is communities are something you come up with. There are common numbers people use for communities, but there is no rule on what you have to number your communities as. So before we proceed we will need to also know what our own ASN is.  For XYZ we will say they were assigned AS64512. For those of you who are familiar with BGP, you will see this is a private ASN.  I just used this to lessen any confusion.  If you are following along at home replace 65412 with your own ASN.

So we will create four communities .

64512:100 = transit
64512:200 = peers
64512:300 = customers
64512:400 = my routes

Where did we create these? For now on paper.

So let’s break down each of these and how they apply to XYZ network. If you need some help with the terminology see this previous post.
64512:100 – Transit
Transit will apply to Typhoon Electric and Basement3.  These are companies you are buying internet transit from.

64512:200 – Peers
Peers apply to HopOffACloud and the IX. These are folks you are just exchanging your own and your customer’s routes with.

64512:300 – Customers
This applies to Mauler Automotive.  This is a customer buying Internet from you. They transit your network to get to the Internet.

64512:200 – Local
This applies to your own prefixes.  These are routes within your own network or this particular ASN.

Our next step is to take the incoming traffic and classify into one of these communities. Once we have it classified we can do stuff with it.

If we wanted to classify the Typhoon Electric traffic we would do the following in Mikrotik land:

/routing filter
add action=passthrough chain=TYPHOON-IN prefix=0.0.0.0/0 prefix-length=0-32 set-bgp-communities=64512:100 comment="Tag incoming prefixes with :100"

This would go at the top of your filter chain for the Typhoon Electric peer.  This simply applies 64512:100 to the prefixes learned from Typhoon.

In Cisco Land our configuration would look like this:

route-map Typhoon-in permit 20  
match ip address 102  
set community 64512:100

The above Cisco configuration creates a route map, matches a pre-existing access list named 102, and applies community 64512:100 to prefixes learned.

For Juniper you can add the following command to an incoming peer in policy-options:

set community Typhoon-in members 64512:100

Similar to the others you are applying this community to a policy.

So what have we done so far, we have taken the received prefixes from Typhoon Electric and applied community 64512:100 to it.  This simply puts a classifier on all traffic from that peer. We could modify the above example to classify traffic from our other peers based upon what community we want them tagged as.

In our next segment we will learn what we can do with these communities.

WISPS growing up in the tower industry Part 1

As more and more Wireless ISPs (WISPS) get into licensed microwaves, bigger antennas, and fiber up the tower (FUTT) they are getting into an arena typically reserved just for the Cellular and broadcast folks.  This can result in an overwhelming amount of things to deal with.

If you are renting space on a commercial tower managed by a regional or national company such as American Tower (ATC) you will run into things like application fees, engineering studies, and closeout documents to just name a few. Once you have your notice to proceed (NTP), the real work begins.

During your negotiation phase, and in your contract, you should have a center line on the tower.  This states the center line on the tower where your equipment is mounted.  An example is if your centerline states 200, on most contracts that means you have something like 5 feet above that and 5 feet below that.  Think of it as a window.  You have a window of 195-205′ on the tower for your equipment to fit in.

IMG_9712

Centerline example. Photo courtesy of Michael Pelsor

The equipment you put on the tower was specified in the engineering phase of the paperwork.  Model numbers of mounts, antenna models, and all that are decided before the first piece of equipment is ever put on the tower. This is very important to adhere to because many tower companies will require a closeout procedure.  This normally includes pictures of your equipment and how it’s mounted, pictures of what is called a tape drop, and other things.

IMG_4586

Tape Drop Pic courtesy of Michael Pelsor

The sheer amount of things to think about on a commercial tower with multiple tenants could extend this blog post on for a long time. But, one of the biggest things to consider is when you are installing how your cable runs, antennas, etc. are in relationship to other equipment.  Are your cables somewhere they might be stepped on by someone passing your equipment to get to theirs? Does your equipment cross mounts which may be removed later or modified?

In the second part of this series we will talk about some of the higher-end tools which may save you tons of time, thus paying for themselves rather quickly.