Vulnerability in WPA2

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/10/severe-flaw-in-wpa2-protocol-leaves-wi-fi-traffic-open-to-eavesdropping/

An air of unease set into the security circles on Sunday as they prepared for the disclosure of high-severity vulnerabilities in the Wi-Fi Protected Access II protocol that make it possible for attackers to eavesdrop Wi-Fi traffic passing between computers and access points.

The proof-of-concept exploit is called KRACK, short for Key Reinstallation Attacks. The research has been a closely guarded secret for weeks ahead of a coordinated disclosure that’s scheduled for 8am Monday, East Coast time. An advisory the US CERT recently distributed to about 100 organizations described the research this way:

US-CERT has become aware of several key management vulnerabilities in the 4-way handshake of the Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) security protocol. The impact of exploiting these vulnerabilities includes decryption, packet replay, TCP connection hijacking, HTTP content injection, and others. Note that as protocol-level issues, most or all correct implementations of the standard will be affected. The CERT/CC and the reporting researcher KU Leuven, will be publicly disclosing these vulnerabilities on 16 October 2017.

 

From Mikrotik:

On October 16. CERT/CC/ICASI released a public announcement about discovered vulnerabilities in WPA2 handshake protocols that affect most WiFi users and all vendors world wide.
RouterOS v6.39.3, v6.40.4, v6.41rc are not affected!
It is important to note that the vulnerability is discovered in the protocol itself, so even a correct implementation is affected.
These organizations did contact us earlier, so we have already released fixed versions that address the outlined issues. Not all of the discovered vulnerabilities directly impact RouterOS users, or even apply to RouterOS, but we did follow all recommendations and improved the key exchange process according to the guidelines we received from the organizations who discovered the issue.
We released fixed versions last week, so if you upgrade your devices routinely, no further action is required.
CWE-323
CVE-2017-13077
CVE-2017-13078
CVE-2017-13079
CVE-2017-13080
CVE-2017-13081
CVE-2017-13082
CVE-2017-13083
CVE-2017-13084
CVE-2017-13085
CVE-2017-13086
CVE-2017-13087

 

Dirty Cow is Coming – Update your *nix boxes

Dirty COW (CVE-2016-5195) is a privilege escalation vulnerability in the Linux Kernel.

This is an old vulnerability but appears to be something being exploited regularly.  In otherwords, keep your stuff up-to-date.

https://github.com/dirtycow/dirtycow.github.io/wiki/VulnerabilityDetails

https://dirtycow.ninja/

Check to see if your systems are vulnerable:
https://github.com/dirtycow/dirtycow.github.io/wiki/Check-if-your-system-is-vulnerable