5.8 Cambium Elevated Devices & Max EIRP

Lately, we have had a few clients run into signals becoming worse when they elevated clients to ePMP.   This is not a result of the software being bad, but it enforcing the max EIRP on the units.  This boils down to older devices compliant with original FCC grants which allowed unlimited EIRP.  The Cambium elevate recognizes the latest grant for the devices.  This grant allows for a max of 41 dBM on 5/10/20 mhz channels and 38dBM on 40mhz.

So if you have elevated some older devices from UBNT your signals may have dropped.  This is due to compliance with the latest rules for the device.   As our industry matures, becoming compliant will become more and more important.  On the UBNT units, newer firmware from UBNT also does this.

Cambium has a forum post on this. http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-Elevate/5-8-GHz-Elevated-Devices-Maximum-EIRP-in-the-United-States/m-p/73141#M475

We have some tricks of the trade we can do. Contact MTIN for how we can help.

Libre and Cambium

What Can Libre do for the Cambium operator?

Number of registered SMs. This AP has 7

 

Interface traffic

Number of GPS Satellites tracked

Modulation

Libre can be setup for thresholds.  Any of the above graphs can be set up to alert based upon a threshold.  You could setup an alert that says if SMs on an AP drop by 10% kick out an alert.  This could alert you to possible frequency issues.   You could set a threshold for if traffic reaches a certain level.

Learning, certifications and the xISP

One of the most asked questions which comes up in the xISP world is “How do I learn this stuff?”.   Depending on who you ask this could be a lengthy answer or a simple one sentence answer.  Before we answer the question, let’s dive into why the answer is complicated.

In many enterprise environments, there is usually pretty standard deployment of networking hardware.  Typically this is from a certain vendor.  There are many factors involved. in why this is.  The first is total Cost of Ownership (TCO).  It almost always costs less to support one product than to support multiples.  Things like staff training are usually a big factor.  If you are running Cisco it’s cheaper to train and keep updated on just Cisco rather than Cisco and another vendor.

Another factor involved is economies of scale.  Buying all your gear from a certain vendor allows you to leverage buying power. Quantity discounts in other words.  You can commit to buying product over time or all at once.

So, to answer this question in simple terms.  If your network runs Mikrotik, go to a Mikrotik training course.  If you run Ubiquiti go to a Ubiquiti training class.

Now that the simple question has been answered, let’s move on to the complicated, and typically the real world answer and scenario.  Many of our xISP clients have gear from several vendors deployed.  They may have several different kinds of Wireless systems, a switch solution, a router solution, and different pieces in-between.  So where does a person start?

We recommend the following path. You can tweak this a little based on your learning style, skill level, and the gear you want to learn.

1.Start with the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification in Routing and Switching (R&S).  There are a ton of ways to study for this certification.   There are Bootcamps (not a huge fan of these for learning), iPhone and Android Apps (again these are more focused on getting the cert), online, books, and even youtube videos. Through the process of studying for this certification, you will learn many things which will carry over to any vendor.  Things like subnetting, differences between broadcast and collision domains, and even some IPV6 in the newest tracks.  During the course of studying you will learn, and then reinforce that through practice tests and such.  Don’t necessarily focus on the goal of passing the test, focus on the content of the material.  I used to work with a guy who went into every test with the goal of passing at 100%.  This meant he had to know the material. CompTIA is a side path to the Cisco CCNA.  For reasons explained later, COMPTIA Network+ doesn’t necessarily work into my plan, especially when it comes to #3. I would recommend COMPTIA if you have never taken a certification test before.

2.Once you have the CCNA under your belt, take a course in a vendor you will be working the most with.  At the end of this article, I am going to add links to some of the popular vendor certifications and then 3rd party folks who teach classes. One of the advantages of a 3rd party teacher is they are able to apply this to your real world needs. If you are running Mikrotik, take a class in that. Let the certification be a by-product of that class.

3.Once you have completed #1 and #2 under your belt go back to Cisco for their Cisco Certifed Design Associate (CCDA). This is a very crucial step those on a learning path overlook.  Think of your networking knowledge as your end goal is to be able to build a house.  Steps one and two have given you general knowledge, you can now use tools, do some basic configuration.  But you can’t build a house without knowing what is involved in designing foundations,  what materials you need to use, how to compact the soil, etc.  Network design is no different. These are not things you can read in a manual on how to use the tool.  They also are not tool specific.   Some of the things in the Cisco CCDA will be specific to Cisco, but overall it is a general learning track.  Just follow my philosophy in relationship to #1. Focus on the material.

Once you have all of this under your belt look into pulling in pieces of other knowledge. Understanding what is going on is a key to your success.  If you understand what goes on with an IP packet, learning tools like Wireshark will be easier.  As you progress let things grow organically from this point.  Adding equipment in from a Vendor? Update your knowledge or press the new vendor for training options.  Branch out into some other areas ,such as security, to add to your overall understanding.

Never stop learning! Visit our online store for links to recommend books and products.

WISP Based Traning Folks.
These companies and individuals provide WISP based training. Some of it is vendor focused. Some are not.  My advice is to ask questions. See if they are a fit for what your goals are.
-Connectivity Engineer
Butch Evans
Dennis Burgess
Rickey Frey
Steve Discher
Baltic Networks

Vendor Certification Pages
Ubiquiti
Mikrotik
Cisco
Juniper
CWNA
CompTIA

If you provide training let me know and I will add you to this list.

Cambium ePMP 2.6 released

Release 2.6 update includes: 

  • RADIUS Authentication of Administrative Users – Allows for the centralization in a RADIUS server of passwords and administrative access to ePMP network elements
  • RADIUS Configuration of VLAN – Allows for configuration of VLAN settings on subscriber radios from the settings in the subscriber’s RADIUS profile
  • Support AP Lite License Keys – Allows customers to purchase a license key (Part Number: C050900S200A) that will allow AP Lites to be upgraded to support up to 120 subscriber modules
  • 10 MHz and 5 MHz  Channel sizes for enhanced PTP Mode of Operation – This will allow for easier deployment of ePMP Links in crowded spectrum environments
  • 10 MHz Channel Sizes for AP WiFi and SM WiFi – This will allow for a greater degree of compatibility with existing WiFi based solutions
  • Networking and Operations Feature Enhancements that include Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) Support, Separate Management IP Address Port Forwarding, Wireless MAC Address Filtering for Network Entry, and Display at AP of distance to each SM
  • Improved Interference Tolerance at the AP for On-Channel Interferers

PMP Software release 14.1.1

New Software Release 14.1.1 update includes:

450i Access Point now supports PMP 450 and PMP 430 Subscriber Modules. Network operators can replace a PMP 450 AP with the PMP 450i AP and benefit from improved packets processing capability of the PMP 450i.
450i ETSI complance for EU customers.
450i IC compliance for customers in Canada.

Syncinjectors and PMP450i

This was posted to the AFMUG mailing list from Forrest at Packetflux. Applies to folks with PMP450i and SyncInjectors.

We have recently become aware of a potential issue when using a SyncInjector with a PMP450i. The short version of this issue is that with certain cable runs (mostly longer ones), a PMP450i will refuse to accept the sync from the SyncInjector as valid, even though the pulse is perfectly valid and should be accepted by the PMP450i.

Currently, there are two ways this can be fixed. Since the pulse is valid, but just not recognized as valid by the currently shipping PMP450i firmware, Cambium could fix this in software. I believe they are currently investigating this as an issue, and I honestly expect them to release a fix assuming it isn’t a major issue to do so. If this happens, it should address all of the existing SyncInjectors in the field which our customers may want to use in the future with a a PMP450i.

The second way to fix this issue is for us to modify our sync pulse slightly so that it is in line with what the PMP450i is expecting. Because this modification has some additional benefits beyond better interoperability with the current PMP450i firmware (such as the modified pulse being less likely to induct noise into adjoining cables), we have decided to proceed down this path as well.

During the next week or so, we will begin shipping Revision I0 of our Gigabit SyncInjector Product. The first of these are currently working their way through our assembly line. This version contains improved support for voltages above 58V and also the waveform modification mentioned above. It should be functionally identical to the earlier Revision H0 SyncInjectors. It is not our intention to update our non-gigabit injectors at this time.

If you are currently having problems with sync over power on a Gigabit SyncInjector and a PMP450i, please send an email into custsvc@packetflux.com and we will work with you to ensure you have hardware which will work with your hardware.

ePMP Version 2.3.1 released

PDF Release notes can be found at http://community.cambiumnetworks.com/t5/ePMP-1000/New-ePMP-Release-2-3-1-now-available/m-p/37067#U37067

Highlights Include:
o RFC1213 supports standard interface MIBs. Items such as Ethernet interface Tx/Rx and
corresponding stats are now supported per the standard RFC. This allows users to utilize 3rd party monitoring tools that support RFC1213
Separate Management IP when SM is in NAT mode
o Separate Wireless Management IP will provide the ability to separate management traffic from user traffic when the SM is configured in NAT mode providing separate management access to the SM. This includes the ability to have a separate management interface when PPPoE is enabled on the SM.
ARP table display
o Displays all the ARP entries for interfaces present in the routing table
VoIP helper functionality under NAT
o When the SM is in NAT mode, ePMP inspects SDP packets and automatically creates appropriate